Choose the Path for Your Project

The ADDIE instructional design model forms a roadmap for the entire training project.

Intulogy uses this popular instructional design model to help our clients analyze their training needs, design and develop training materials, implement training, and evaluate its effectiveness.

Sometimes, Intulogy works directly with a client’s training specialists, who have studied the ADDIE model in graduate school. However, we’re often contacted by directors and executives who know their company has a training need, but they don’t know much about the instructional design process.

Intulogy’s training specialists share a flowchart of the ADDIE instructional design model with our clients. It helps our clients locate where they are in the training project lifecycle, and it provides a common language for us to discuss the project.

Going through the ADDIE steps can answer many common questions about a training project:

  • How do we estimate the budget we’ll need for this training developement?
  • How can we evaluate our course’s effectiveness?
  • Should we deliver this course online instead of in a classroom?

Why should you use the ADDIE methodology for your company’s training?

At Intulogy, we often receive calls saying, “we have this training course, but it doesn’t really seem to be working.  Can you help us?”  What we find is that the “course” is over a hundred Powerpoint slides in 8 point font.  Or, the functional expert, who knows the subject inside out, wrote and delivers the training.  Sometimes that’s a good thing.  More often though, the functional expert has no knowledge of adult learning principles and has done nothing to design the course in a way that others will understand it.

Soon after the U.S. Army had the ADDIE methodology developed in 1975, it became known as the Instructional System Design process.  Just like you wouldn’t conceive, design and build your products without a process, you also shouldn’t manage your primary human resource development activity, training, without using ADDIE.

Read more about the ADDIE and instructional design models in our blog.